Posts in Tag

respect

My cat, Kipsy, has my respect. In fact, most cats have my respect. We can learn a lot from the feline world to help us become better leaders. Here are some of the leadership skills I learned from my cat: 1.Clear boundaries There are certain times I can interact with my cat and times when I can’t. These moments are completely determined by her.  If she is receptive to cuddles or petting, she purrs and rubs her face against my ankles to signify it is okay to touch her.  If it is

Youth Get a Bad Rep Listening about a new program coming to the educational institute I work for, my attention was peaked when the coordinator said there would be a class to teach “tact and diplomacy”.   I was intrigued because I am in the business of image, etiquette and leadership in my side hustle, VNC Image and Leadership.   Tact and diplomacy are things I teach or talk about. In my opinion, the basics of manners, protocol, image and respect (the precursors to tact and diplomacy) are in demand

  I’ve been working for many (many, many) years towards getting a business off the ground. The vision began with a joke between a friend of mine and myself. We were both career counsellors at an employment agency and were commenting on the need for some of our clients to understand the importance of their attitude, wardrobe, manners and behaviour choices. We thought it would be funny to have our own etiquette business to teach these necessary but absent skills. After some time and several clients later, I began to

These are women that I see as role models. They are women I’d like to have at my supper table and who I’d love to sit down and chat with. From what I know of them (and of course that is through the lens of the media) they exemplify the following characteristics: Criteria: • Often seen smiling • Present positively • Sense of humour • Well – groomed • Well dressed • Courteous • Humble • Giving • Authentic • Not afraid to look silly • Courageous • Confident •

Whether we like it or not, agree with it or not, judgments will be made about us. If we do not take into consideration how we look or act, these judgments may not be in our favour. Furthermore, these assumptions may not only be made about us but could be made about our positions, our departments and/or the organizations we work for. Therefore, it is very important to put thoughtful consideration into our appearance and behaviour.

Inspired by a conversation I heard on my favourite radio morning show this week, I thought I’d write about the unwritten rules of Grocery Store Etiquette.  It stemmed from a trivia contest about self-check-outs at many grocery and department stores these days.  It then morphed into a chat about pet peeves, not only at the self-check-outs but shopping experiences in general.  Have you ever been frustrated by your visits to the supermarket because of what you felt was “rude” behaviour of other shoppers?  I certainly have and I know my

  Volunteering at a recent event, I was amongst 4 retired gentleman.  Each of them was probably around the age of 60.  The event lasted a few days so I had the pleasure of these gentleman’s company for the duration of that time.  We checked in at Volunteer Headquarters every morning and then caught a shuttle bus to our designated work areas.  I couldn’t help but notice the overabundant politeness that seemed to take place.  Each of them insisted I enter the shuttle first, they stood if I stood, they

What do you think of when you think of civility?  Is it putting up with the in-laws when they drop in unannounced?  Maybe tolerating the sniffling of the co-worker in the cubicle beside you.  Or do you think of keeping your dog fenced in yard so he doesn’t do his business on someone else’s lawn.  Do you ever consider your respect for the environment as an act of civility?  Let’s not forget that we are only borrowing this space on earth while we are here.  Respecting the elements is important

I watched the memorial presentation for the tragedy of 9/11.  I can’t believe that 10 years have passed.  No other day, no other moment, no other memory is as burned in my mind as September 11, 2001.  Everyone has their own account of where they were and what they were doing when the planes began to crash.  Many larger-than-life images instantaneously come to our minds without thinking.  But, when I sift through the rubble in my mind of that day, I remember the fantastic acts of human spirit that manifested

No one wants a strike.  Striking is a last resort when an agreement cannot be made by an organization and its workers.  Employees do not want to relinquish their pay cheques to walk a picket line and employers don’t want to loose the labour.  Any public involved do not want the inconvenience of lost production, services or having to cross that picket line.  As unpleasant as they are, sometimes they are a necessary evil in order to move forward.  When presented with a strike situation, there a few things to

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