Posts in Category

Respect

Comparing my young life to that of my 11 year-old son, Ethan’s,  I am struck by the parallelisms between the two.  After finishing grade 3, my family had moved.  Permanently changing schools gave me the fear and the excitement of leaving behind the familiar and journeying into the unknown at such a young age. Likewise, at the end of Ethan’s grade 3 year, we moved.  He too, had to adapt to life in a new school. When I changed schools, I went to a school that was so new, it was only

Youth Get a Bad Rep Listening about a new program coming to the educational institute I work for, my attention was peaked when the coordinator said there would be a class to teach “tact and diplomacy”.   I was intrigued because I am in the business of image, etiquette and leadership in my side hustle, VNC Image and Leadership.   Tact and diplomacy are things I teach or talk about. In my opinion, the basics of manners, protocol, image and respect (the precursors to tact and diplomacy) are in demand

When I am researching for articles, posts or material for VNC Image & Etiquette, I have many words that I will use in my search that are related.  I’ve included them here.  Let me know of words that you might think of and include them in the comments below. Etiquette Manners Image Wardrobe Style Fashion Look Leadership Career Success Civility Kindness Courtesy Mentorship Career Politeness Positivity Optimistic Friendliness Thoughtfulness Respect Self-esteem Confidence Congeniality Social Grace Charm Protocol Butler Poise Elegance Class

  Confidence is key in this western society that we live in. Jobs, relationships, perceptions and self-esteem can all be made or broken by how much confidence we exude or don’t. Many times, we simply are not confident. We might be nervous, feel inferior, not feel knowledgeable or unprepared and worry that we just don’t fit the bill. Even though we may feel that way, it doesn’t mean we can’t present ourselves confidently.  Even just looking the part despite not feeling it, can get us through until, eventually, our artificial

These are women that I see as role models. They are women I’d like to have at my supper table and who I’d love to sit down and chat with. From what I know of them (and of course that is through the lens of the media) they exemplify the following characteristics: Criteria: • Often seen smiling • Present positively • Sense of humour • Well – groomed • Well dressed • Courteous • Humble • Giving • Authentic • Not afraid to look silly • Courageous • Confident •

Whether we like it or not, agree with it or not, judgments will be made about us. If we do not take into consideration how we look or act, these judgments may not be in our favour. Furthermore, these assumptions may not only be made about us but could be made about our positions, our departments and/or the organizations we work for. Therefore, it is very important to put thoughtful consideration into our appearance and behaviour.

I often have conversations with people about how society has lost it’s courtesy and civility.  It often leads to discussions of entitlement and how our youth today, don’t seem to have the understanding of manners and decorum that once used to be taught in school and practiced at home.  Then, you sit by the young gentleman in a small plane who gets up and assists you to your seat and starts polite conversation and you realize that all is not lost in the world of polite society.  When instructed to

Inspired by a conversation I heard on my favourite radio morning show this week, I thought I’d write about the unwritten rules of Grocery Store Etiquette.  It stemmed from a trivia contest about self-check-outs at many grocery and department stores these days.  It then morphed into a chat about pet peeves, not only at the self-check-outs but shopping experiences in general.  Have you ever been frustrated by your visits to the supermarket because of what you felt was “rude” behaviour of other shoppers?  I certainly have and I know my

  Volunteering at a recent event, I was amongst 4 retired gentleman.  Each of them was probably around the age of 60.  The event lasted a few days so I had the pleasure of these gentleman’s company for the duration of that time.  We checked in at Volunteer Headquarters every morning and then caught a shuttle bus to our designated work areas.  I couldn’t help but notice the overabundant politeness that seemed to take place.  Each of them insisted I enter the shuttle first, they stood if I stood, they

What do you think of when you think of civility?  Is it putting up with the in-laws when they drop in unannounced?  Maybe tolerating the sniffling of the co-worker in the cubicle beside you.  Or do you think of keeping your dog fenced in yard so he doesn’t do his business on someone else’s lawn.  Do you ever consider your respect for the environment as an act of civility?  Let’s not forget that we are only borrowing this space on earth while we are here.  Respecting the elements is important

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